Makes you wonder, “Who’s the Boss?”

“Kind of makes you wonder, who the boss is here, doesn’t it?” This was the last thing my neurologist said to my son in law as we left his office on Thursday.  You see, being on the MS drug Tysabri, requires me to perform three actions each year to remain on the drug.   I believe the three things I am required to do are CYA (cover your ass) for the doctors and drug company, though they present it as for my safety….shrug

A little bit of the back story here.  When Tysabri first came out on the market, it had to be recalled twice because the risks outweighed the potential benefits.  (it killed people)  Ok while it didn’t kill people itself, it caused some to develop PML (Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare and usually fatal viral disease characterized by progressive damage (-pathy) or inflammation of the white matter (leuko-) of the brain (-encephalo-) at multiple locations (multifocal).) which did kill people.   Either way it had to go.

Back on the Market

I began the drug shortly after it was released the 3rd time.  (YAH sign me up?!?!?)  SMH, actually for me, the risks were nothing in comparison to the potential gains. I was going downhill fast.  If you would like to read about how/why I started Tysabri, the first post of the “series” can be found here.

When they released the drug for the 3rd time, doctors had to require patients to meet the following conditions each year to remain on the drug.  The first is that they have to have an MRI of their brain yearly to look for signs of PML.  The second is that they have to have blood tests to determine if they are positive or negative for the JC virus.  Finally, they have to see their neurologist at least once a year to be reminded of the risks, and that the longer you are on Tysabri, the more likely it is that you will develop PML.

Having completed the first two requirements this summer, meant that I needed to see my neuro.  Not an easy feat considering I still can’t drive and his office is 2 hours away in Chicago.  Thankfully, my son in law said he would take me and spend the day with me.  (I really am blessed)

Z arrived right on time to pick me up.  During the two hour drive to the city, we discussed (debated) the pros and cons of Technology.  I will write more about that another day though.  Basically, I agreed to let him tell me about some apps that may make things easier for me, if he agreed to let me play devils advocate about the potential risks.  I think we both learned somethings.

The wait to see my doc was short.  He came to the waiting area and said, “C’mon Grace follow me”.  He didn’t notice my boot until, he turned around to see how I was walking.  (nothing like a having the pressure of having someone judge your balance as you try to balance) smh  He asked, “What happened now?”.  I briefly told him, he shook his head, and we entered the exam room.  We all sat down, and he said, “I was surprised to see you on the schedule, I never see you unless something is really wrong.  What’s going on?”  I chuckled, “just doing the yearly thing.”

First we reviewed the MRI of my brain.  There were no real changes to report, other than a little bit of atrophy and brain shrinkage.  (this also happens as we age, and was nothing major)  I did tell him about the newer symptom of “spins”, but only that I wanted him to put it in my chart, nothing else at this time.  He asked if I wanted to check disease progression in my spine with MRI.  (most of my lesions ARE in my spine)  I declined.

Next were the JCV test results.  The results were indeterminate.  (not negative or positive, literally indeterminate)  ok?  NEXT?

Doc: “You don’t want to talk about switching medications?”

Grace: Nope!  Thanks though

Doc:  “you do know that there is a new drug out  called OCEVERUS?”

Grace: Yep!

He began to shake his head again.  So I pulled the pamphlet out of my purse, and said listen Doc…let me be honest with you…. “I’m aware of the drug and the benefit of only having to have an infusion 2x a year, however at this time I’m just watching”.  I continued with:

  1.  I’ve done my stint as a guinea pig in the clinical trials for Botox
  2. It’s still too new, and carries the same risks as Tysabri.
  3. Basically the amount of time I “lose” getting this drug is the same amount I lose getting Tysabri ( Oceverus 2x a year 8 hrs each time vs.  Tysabri 12-13 x times a year 2 hours at a time)  Besides, I have a port in my chest that has to be flushed every thirty days regardless of whether or not it’s used, so it would be the same
  4. I also explained that I used my Tysabri infusion to meet my Medicaid spendown each month (but more on that another time)

He asked if the surgeon was going to send me to physical therapy after the boot came off.  I think I surprised him when I not only agreed to use a wheeled walker, (if Medicare will cover it of course) but that I would also like to go the PT, not only to aid my foot in healing, but to help with my balance and gait issues.  I asked HIM to write the prescription for both (pt and the walker) knowing that the likeliness of insurance covering both would be increased if they were given more reasons to approve it, (gait, balance issues, strengthening etc) than just “to aid in post op recovery”.  Isn’t it sad that it’s all a “game”?  Fortunately? for me I’ve been playing a long time.  SMH  We shall see.

Before I left, I did ask him for his opinion on the  various “diets” that are out there and how they may affect MS.  I know that I am not easy to “work with” sometimes, but that doesn’t mean I don’t want to do everything I can to fight this monster.  I just don’t believe that taking more drugs is the way to do it.

The diets I mentioned were the Wahl’s protocol, Paleo, and the Ketogenic diet.  I am not sure which if any I will follow, but I am in the process of learning about all three.  I have to admit that even a simple reduction in carbs and the addition of colored veggies to my to my normal SEE FOOD (see food and eat it) diet would be a good place to start.

Before we got up to leave, the doctor asked me if I would be willing to talk to other patients with MS.  I told him I do, all the time.  He was inquiring in more of a professional  capacity to which I responded that I was happy to  anytime, if he wanted to give someone my name and number, but never representing the hospital or his office.  (My use of the F bombs would disqualify me from that position.)

In closing,

The answer to the question of who is the boss…. I am!

It’s my body, my right, and my choice.

I am very fortunate to have a doctor that understands my feeling on this.  He also knows that while I do take some, I hate taking medications of any kind, and am always very reluctant to call, so when I do, he gives me priority.  I hope that if you are dealing with MS, or another chronic illness that you have found a doctor that is willing listen to and respects your opinions as well.

*The featured image is the inside of my daughter’s Beast for work….but doesn’t it make you wonder who is in control, or responsible?